Warriors, Weapons and Horses: conserving folios from a Mamluk manuscript

The Mamluks ruled Syria and Egypt from 1250 until they were defeated by the Ottoman’s in 1517. Very few illustrated manuscripts from this era have survived, but one of them is held at the Chester Beatty. This bound manuscript (CBL Ar 5655), dating from the mid-14th century, is a Compendium of Military Arts featuring warfare, weaponry and horsemanship.  Twelve separate folios from the manuscript have recently been conserved in preparation for our upcoming temporary exhibition, Gift of a Lifetime (opening on 19th October 2018).

Fig 1

CBL Ar 5655.134 before treatment.

The thickly applied white pigment (probably lead white) on the faces and turbans of the warriors had suffered serious cracking and in some cases small losses. In other more localised areas there was cracking and slight flaking/powdering of some pigments, particularly in association with creases in the paper. It is also likely that the smooth surface of the highly burnished paper support had contributed to the loss of media.

Fig 2

Left: Cracking of media associated with creases in the paper (CBL Ar 5655.134); Right: Flaking white pigment (CBL Ar 5655.134).

All of the pigments were checked under magnification and consolidated as needed using Bermocoll, a synthetic cellulose-based adhesive. Isopropanol was applied to the edge of the flaking areas using a very fine brush, directly followed by the adhesive applied with a second brush. The alcohol acts as a wetting agent, reducing the surface tension of the adhesive so it is drawn underneath the flaking pigment layer by capillary action. On drying, the adhesive secures the fragile pigment layer to the paper below.

On a number of folios the paper along the spine edge was fragile and torn with paper fibres at risk of being lost. A small number of tears along the creases in the paper were also apparent. The folios had been repaired in the past and although these historic repairs were indiscreet it was decided that they should be left intact because they had not caused any damage to the folios and can now be considered to be part of the object’s history.

Fig 3

CBL Ar 5655.159 in transmitted light, showing the historic repairs.

Repairs were carried out to stabilise the damaged areas of paper and ensure that no further damage would occur through handling. As the thin Islamic paper was particularly susceptible to distortion with the addition of moisture, the repair methods were chosen carefully to ensure that only a very small amount of moisture was introduced. The tears were repaired using remoistenable tissue, a very thin Japanese tengujo paper pre-prepared with 1% methyl cellulose adhesive. Along the spine edge the loose fibres were secured with thick wheat starch paste. In some areas bridge repairs were added to support small parts of the paper that were at risk of detaching.

Fig 4

Left: Repairing a tear on CBL Ar 5655.161 using remoistenable tissue; Right: Applying small bridge repairs to the spine edge of CBL Ar 5655.162.

For the bridge repairs, Japanese paper fibres were teased out from the torn edge of a long-fibred kozo paper and rolled together between finger and thumb to create tiny bridges. The repair fibres were then pasted with wheat starch paste and positioned carefully across the damaged areas.

Fig 5

Detail of the spine edge of CBL Ar 5655.134, before treatment in transmitted light (left) and after treatment (right).

Whilst working on these charming miniatures I had the chance to observe some of the techniques used by the artist(s). Scoring lines (visible in raking light) had been used to plan out the symmetrical designs and under-drawing was visible where the pigments had been lost from the faces and turbans. Interestingly, the pigment on the back of the black horses had a shiny finish and there was slight cupping of the painted surface. This suggests that a surface coating was applied locally over the black pigment before burnishing to create this lustrous finish. The undersides of the black horses were left without this additional surface treatment leaving the pigment more matte, possibly to give the effect of shading.

Fig 6

Left: Ar 5655.167 in raking light, showing the scoring lines used to map out the design; Right: Ar 5655.156, showing both shiny and matte media on the black horse.

Fig 7

Mounting the Ar 5655 folios.

After treatment, the Mamluk folios were secured in window mounts using T-hinges made from Japanese sekishu paper adhered with wheat starch paste. The folios will be on display alongside other treasures from the Chester Beatty collection, in the exhibition ‘Gift of a Lifetime’ (19th October 2018—28th April 2019). We do hope you’ll come and see it!

Alice Derham, Heritage Council Intern in Conservation

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty’s magnificent bequest, Gift of a Lifetime (19 October 2018 – 28 April 2019) presents a choice selection of masterpieces from this unique collection. You can find out more about some of the treasures in the exhibition here

 

 

Advertisements

Conserving the Past, Training for the Future: a one day symposium at the Chester Beatty

2018 commemorates the 50th anniversary of Chester Beatty’s death and to mark the occasion a programme of events are being held across the year, including a day-long conservation symposium,  celebrating the conservation internships at the Chester Beatty.

_DSC6309

Conserving the Past, Training for the Future, Symposium at the Chester Beatty Library, June 2018.

Having been an intern at the Chester Beatty from 2014-2015, I know how valuable the internship programme can be for emerging conservators. I was delighted that I was able to attend the symposium, which included a tour of the studio. Here we had the chance to meet all of the past interns that were able to attend, the current intern Alice Derham, as well as Kristine Rose-Beers and Julia Poirier to see the projects they have been working on.

The symposium began with a warm welcome from Jessica Baldwin, Head of Collections and Conservation. Jessica opened the Conservation Department at the Chester Beatty in 2003, and hosted the first conservation internship in 2005. By 2006, the programme was co-funded by the Heritage Council. This short blog will run through the talks presented during the symposium on Friday 8th June 2018.

Chester Beatty_Conservation_Programme_2018-06-08

Louise O’Connor, now  Conservator at the National Library of Ireland (NLI) became the first intern at the Chester Beatty in 2005. Her talk ‘Conservation internships: Nurturing an acorn’ guided us through the importance of having internships available to train students and recent graduates to ensure not only their development, but to make certain that the skills needed for the preservation of our collections, continues to be developed. Louise took us back through her career, and it is clear that she has taken from her past experiences to ensure that she is able to provide emerging professionals with a varied and valuable experience. Louise is now one of the hosts for the Heritage Council internship held at the NLI.

Reception

Interns past and present had a chance to catch up after the symposium on our wonderful roof garden.

The global-scale of conservation and the many different experiences one can undertake was wonderfully described by Elisabeth Randell, who is currently a conservator at the British Library. Her talk ‘Conservation in motion’ explained how gaining experience in several different heritage institutions in Canada, Ireland and the UK, helped her to discover the pathway she wanted to take, which was ultimately in paper conservation. Being exposed to different collections and methodologies in different countries has given Elisabeth a varied experienced.

After lunch in the sunshine, Kristine introduced the afternoon session. The first speaker was Rachael Smith, Drawings Conservator at Royal Collection Trust, Windsor Castle. She discussed a recent intensive project where she conserved a large collection of Indian paintings and manuscripts on paper. Having worked with similar collections at the Chester Beatty, Rachael detailed the conservation treatments and mounting systems used for this project. It was interesting for Rachael to share her experience during her time at the Chester Beatty, which clearly helped to develop her understanding of Indian collections. Her work at Royal Collection Trust can be seen in the Splendours of the Subcontinent: Four Centuries of South Asian Paintings and Manuscripts exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, London. The project has also expanded to gallery talks, a news feature on BBC London and a short film about the work undertaken, which can be seen here.

In November 2014, Bevan O’Daly undertook a placement at the Chester Beatty to carry out condition assessments and assist with gallery rotations of textile collections with Karen Horton (Textile Conservator). Bevan’s motivation, hard work and enthusiasm for the textile conservation field has led her to her current post as Textile Conservator at the National Trust, after completing a Master’s in Textile Conservation at the University of Glasgow in 2017. Her talk ‘How long is a piece of string’ was given by the only non-paper conservator of the day where she discussed the many non-textile materials she has encountered during her time in the field alongside the variety of objects she has treated in the past year.

_DSC6305.jpg

Fiona McLees presenting the final paper at the Conservation Symposium.

The last talk of the day was given by Fiona McLees, Paper Conservator at the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, who was an intern at the Chester Beatty from 2011-2012. Fiona’s talk ‘Beyond paper: Mummy bandages & sticks of rock’ highlighted the range of work and the variety of objects that can be included in a paper conservator’s remit. From acting as a courier to international institutions to install works of art for display to running a workshop for children about conservation, details the range of responsibilities for the professional.

The day of lectures was incredibly insightful; having worked with Bevan during my time at the Chester Beatty, and Rachael in my current post at Royal Collection Trust, it was pleasing to see the accomplishments of my former and current colleagues. I was delighted to meet the previous interns I had not yet met and to discover more about their experiences and achievements. Similarly, it was a pleasure to catch up with my former colleagues and friends from both the Chester Beatty and other institutions in Dublin.

JessicaI would like to say a special thanks to Jessica for the enormous effort she has put into establishing this internship program. Jessica’s own experiences have enabled her to ensure that interns working at the Chester Beatty have a good team of mentors around them and a healthy and happy life living in Dublin.

I would also like to extend my thanks to Kristine, Julia, Alice and all of the other CB staff who helped to organise such a fantastic day.

Puneeta Sharma, Assistant Drawings Conservator (Prints and Drawings), Royal Collection Trust

Current Chester Beatty intern in Conservation, Alice Derham, will be giving a lunchtime lecture as part of Heritage Week on Wednesday 22nd August at 1:00pm, Intricate Indian Miniatures through the Eyes of a Conservator. Please join us if you can!

Conservation Internship 2018 – Call for applications

The Heritage Council and the Chester Beatty Library are pleased to announce a twelve-month internship in book and/or paper conservation. The scheme is co-funded by the Heritage Council and the generous support of the Library’s Patrons. The internship offers the opportunity to gain professional workplace experience within a prestigious institution.

This year we had the opportunity to catch up with many of the fantastic interns we have had the pleasure to work with over the years at our first Conservation Symposium on 8th June. We look forward to posting a review of this event in the coming weeks.

_DSC6310 (1).jpg

Past interns and the current CBL conservation team at the first Chester Beatty Conservation Symposium.

We are always happy to see past CBL conservation interns go on to achieve success in their careers, and we look forward to welcoming a new conservation intern for 2017-18 in the autumn.

If you are a recent graduate (2016-18) of a recognised book and/or paper conservation training programme and you are interested in joining the CBL conservation team then further information and details on how to apply are available to download via this pdf:

2018_Chester Beatty_Internship in Conservation

The deadline for applications is Friday 31 August and interviews will be held on Friday 28 September 2018.

Conserving the past, training for the future

Maintaining and preserving the Chester Beatty Collections and making them available for the use and enjoyment of the public is at the heart of our mission. As followers of this blog will know, the museum has a dedicated Department that specialises in book and paper conservation. In June we are hosting a number of special conservation events, the highlight of which is a one-day symposium Conserving the past, training for the future being held at the Chester Beatty on Friday 8 June.

Per 219 for the Muraqqa exhibition 2010

Former intern, Rachel Sawicki, conserving a Persian concertina album in 2010.

By repairing and stabilising the collections in our care, conservators ensure they can be researched, displayed and preserved for future generations. In 2005, an internship programme was established to train and mentor newly-graduated conservators, generously funded by the Chester Beatty Patrons and the Heritage Council. There is currently no formal conservation training available in Ireland, so the internships offer unique professional development opportunities for newly-qualified Irish and international conservators. The Heritage Council’s internship programme has evolved over the past 12 years, and is currently run in partnership with four other leading cultural institutions.

Untitled

Bevan O’Daly working at the National Trust Textile Conservation Studio, U.K.

Internships highlight the significance of collaboration, cross–generational skills-sharing and international networks, which are all hallmarks of the conservation profession today. The central theme for the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018 in Ireland is Make a Connection and the Chester Beatty has organised this one-day symposium as a direct response. This public event will highlight the positive influence the scheme has had on the conservation profession’s network in Ireland, across Europe and beyond.

CB_Intern_FMcLees (2)

Fiona McLees conserving a mezzotint in 2012.

Over twenty interns and placement students specialising in book and paper conservation have been mentored by the staff at the Chester Beatty. Their developing careers have led them to work at leading institutions around the world including the National Gallery of Ireland, Trinity College Dublin, The Tate, V&A, Imperial War Museum, Royal Collection Trust, Bodleian Library, National Trust and the National Libraries of Ireland, Sweden and Australia to name but a few.

For this symposium we have invited five of our alumni to return and present insights into the impact the internship has had on their career and the new challenges they face caring for these extraordinary collections.

The symposium is free to attend, but limited places are available, so booking is essential. We hope to see you there!

Conservation collective Copenhagen

The seventeenth seminar on the Care and Conservation of Manuscripts, was held at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark from 11th to 13th April 2018. This well-established seminar provides an international forum for discussion and exchange between conservators and specialists from related disciplines.

In November last year, both Julia Poirier and I were delighted to hear that our abstracts had been successful and that we had been invited to speak at this event.

My paper, ‘Exploring the materiality of the early Islamic book: preparing to conserve an early Qur’an manuscript in the collections of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty,’ presented the initial findings from my work to conserve CBL Is 1404. Comprised of 201 folios and measuring around 47 x 38 cm, current scholarship suggests that this large Qur’an manuscript is Umayyad—that is it was made before 750 AD under the courtly patronage of the Umayyad Dynasty. It was most likely written on the Arabian Peninsula, possibly in Sana’a, in Yemen.

Is 1404_Opening.jpg

CBL Is 1404

The manuscript has suffered extensive water damage and subsequent corrosion of the iron containing ink it was written with. It has in turn been subject to numerous layers of previous repairs, many of which are now failing, ineffective, and incurring damage to the manuscript. The weight and extent of the repairs was severely restricting the movement of the parchment folios, causing them to buckle and distort unevenly. This in turn was further aggravating the embrittled and ink-damaged parchment, causing it to fragment when flexed. Although the scale of the task was rather daunting, it was clear that these old repairs would need to be released if the manuscript was to be stabilised sufficiently to allow scholarly access or perhaps even display.

Stages

CBL Is 1404 f.13 before, during, and after conservation.

My presentation included details of my treatment methodologies as well as the first results of EQuIP (Early Qur’an Illumination on Parchment) material analysis undertaken in collaboration with the EU-funded MOLAB, and the Books and Beasts BioArCh project at the University of York.

KRB

Presenting my paper. Thank you Sam Foley for capturing the moment!

As well as presenting my own work and receiving feedback from fellow conservators, attending this well-respected conference in Copenhagen gave me the chance to develop relationships with colleagues internationally,  allowing me to expand my research on the materiality of early Qur’anic manuscripts. The chance to hear presentations from conservators working with diverse manuscript collections around the world was invaluable to my understanding of the latest developments in the conservation profession.

Jasdip

Jasdip Singh Dhillon’s paper on Sikh codices.

I was particularly interested to hear Jasdip Singh Dhillon’s paper, ‘Sikh codices with Islamicate bindings: The development of a conservation approach.’ Jasdip works at the Oxford Conservation Consortium and Pothi Seva, and presented his ground-breaking research on the multiple influences on the Sikh binding structure.

Another fascinating paper was presented by Andrew Honey from the Bodleian Library’s conservation team. Andrew’s reflections on working alongside the late Christopher Clarkson to conserve the Winchester Bible, and subsequently continuing with this treatment after Chris’ death, provided a nuanced and personal account of both the great man, and a great manuscript.

JjoZxv9M_400x400‘The biology of the book: Future prospects for biology as a handmaiden to conservation,’ introduced the Beasts to Craft Advanced ERC project team, and announced their recent award of €2.5 million from the European Research Council. The team members include Matthew Collins, Jiři Vnouček, Élodie Lévêque and Sarah Fiddyment, all of whom are working on the latest developments in parchment production, manuscript materiality and conservation. Their ERC funding ensures that this fascinating project can explore new areas of research relating to animal husbandry, parchment manufacture, and the microbiome of individual skins. The opportunity to discuss my own work on CBL Is 1404 with them was invaluable.

Julia’s paper on the history of Samaritan manuscript production was utterly fascinating, and there were audible gasps from the audience in the lecture theatre as she explained and illustrated the unique wooden spine stiffener binding type she has observed. Other excellent papers were given by Georgios Boudalis, Nikki Tomkins, and Nil Baydar amongst others. The standard of presentations was exceedingly high, and all of the speakers provided fascinating insights into their work.

JUlia

Julia Poirier presenting her research on Samaritan bindings.

As a practicing conservator, continuing professional development is an essential part of my duty to maintain professional standards at work. As such, I remain exceedingly grateful for the support of the Chester Beatty, ICRI  and the Heritage Council of Ireland , who facilitated my attendance at this event.

Care and Conservation 17 was directly relevant to my work on the conservation of illuminated manuscripts at the Chester Beatty. It was also particularly valuable to have the opportunity to renew relationships with colleagues working across Europe and the USA, and to share our enthusiasm about continuing projects.

Nyhavn

Nyhavn, Copenhagen.

After the conference, I took the opportunity to explore Copenhagen and visit the David Collection. This beautiful collection of Islamic art, contemporary Danish paintings, and decorative objects is often compared with the Chester Beatty, and provided a very pleasant venue for a morning of exploration. Their current exhibition offered an incredibly informative insight to an often misunderstood subject, The Human Figure in Islamic Art – Holy Men, Princes, and Commoners (November 24th 2017 to May 13th 2018).

 

Kristine Rose-Beers ACR, Senior Conservator

Mirror of the World: Disbinding an early printed copy of Katib Çelebi’s Cihan-numa

In current conservation practice, where minimal intervention is favoured, it is unusual to decide to disbind a book entirely. However, in the case of the Chester Beatty Library’s rare complete copy of Katib Çelebi’s Cihan-numa (Mirror of the World, CBL AA 306) it was decided that this was the best option in order to carry out a comprehensive conservation treatment of the damaged text block. The Cihan-numa was printed by Ibrahim Müteferrika in Constantinople in 1732, and summarised Ottoman geographical knowledge of the time. It was one of the first texts to be published by Müteferrika, founder of the first official Ottoman printing house in Turkey.

Slide1

CBL AA 306 before conservation: the spine, upper board, and opening characteristics of the bound volume.

The book first came to the attention of the conservation department in 2016 when an image of a double folio map was requested for inclusion in the Director’s Choice publication. Due to the restrictive 19th century binding and modern European sewing structure, the opening of the text block was extremely restricted. The text block was already detached from the case binding, and digitisation of the printed map was not possible in situ. In order to facilitate digitisation, the map was removed from the damaged text block so that it could be fully repaired by previous Heritage Council Intern Cécilia Duminuco before digitisation.

Slide2

Removing f.196 in 2016, and the conserved map of present-day Iran, Pakistan and Afghanistan after repair.

It was at this point that I was given the project to work on. One of the most significant factors contributing to the decision to take the text block apart into quires was to allow for complete repair. In particular, the green colour used to paint the frame lines around many of the printed maps had gradually burnt through the paper causing most of the folios to split along this line. Resewing the folios in a more sympathetic style would release the strain on the heavily burnished paper of the text block and reduce the risk of any additional breakage in the areas that were decorated with this copper-containing pigment. Using a traditional Islamic sewing style would also be less restrictive than the heavily glued-up 19th century structure, increasing the opening of the text block and allowing the folios to be viewed right into the gutter edge.

Slide3

The recto (left) and verso (right) of f.86 showing the extent of breaks caused by copper corrosion.

AA306_01_Folio_297_Before_Conservation(4)

Detail of f. 297 before conservation.

While taking apart the text block every detail that could provide information about the original sewing structure was recorded. In the middle of most quires remnants of a pink or red sewing thread and previous sewing stations could be recorded.

Slide4

Evidence of original sewing stations on f.126r- 125v (left); and a detail of the preserved pink sewing threads in the gutter of f.125v (right).

It was also apparent that the text block had not been completely resewn, as previously thought. Instead the back of the text block was sawn into at nine stations and cords were embedded inside these recesses over the previous sewing structure. After which a generous amount of glue was applied before gauze and paper linings were added by the 19th century binder. This treatment ensured the quires would stay together, but also restricted the movement of either the sewing threads, or the heavily burnished paper.

Slide5

Removing the paper and gauze spine linings from the paper text block (left); manually removing the heavy glue accretions (top and middle right); and the spine after glue removal (bottom right).

Slide6

Detail of the nine sawn-in stations and cords.

The gauze and paper backings and the proteinaceous glue were removed manually with a scalpel in order to avoid distorting the highly water sensitive paper with moisture from a poultice. After removing the glue, the quires were separated from each other. Although there was no glue holding the quires together anymore, they did not separate very easily- especially where the paper was sawn into. Great care was necessary to avoid further damage to the paper in those areas. While separating the quires a collation map was prepared in order to chronicle the sewing structure, but which was also used to record any common traits or unusual details found during the process of disbinding. The collation map includes notes of the folios with hand coloured maps, the location of annotations made by someone studying the text in the past, as well as specific damages such as old repairs, damage by insects and copper corrosion.

Slide7

Separating the text block into quires (gatherings of folios).

After separating the folios they were put into tissue folders and placed in temporary storage boxes to await their paper repairs. The paper repairs are now well underway and will be the focus of a future blog post towards the end of the year.

AA306_2_006_separating_folios (150)

Dorothea separating the text block into quires (gatherings of folios).

Dorothea Müller, Heritage Council Intern in Conservation

Dorothea will give a talk about this project as part of Heritage Week in August 2017. Her presentation will take place in the Lecture Room at the Chester Beatty Library, at 1.10pm on Thursday 24th August.

Conservation through generations

 

Oslo Harbour

Oslo Harbour.

Between the 3rd and 5th of May the International Association of Book and Paper Conservators (IADA) hosted their 2017 symposium, ‘From Generation to Generation – Sharing Knowledge, Connecting People,’ at the Oslo Konserthus in Norway, a wonderful modern building in the heart of this capital city.

Slide2

Elizabeth Randell speaking about her experience as an intern at the Chester Beatty and The Oslo Konserthus.

The conference was aimed at exploring the way knowledge and skills are passed on and shared with younger generations of conservators, looking at various teaching programmes worldwide, social media and academic writing amongst other subjects. The conference also focused on practical work, challenges linked to treatments, and our ability as conservators to reflect as we adapt past techniques and create new practices.

I was delighted to be given the opportunity to present a research poster on the use and adaptation of yasha at the Chester Beatty Library. Yasha is a natural dye obtained from the cones of the alder tree, which was first introduced to me by the two wonderful conservators, Andrew Thompson and Sydney Thomson, at the Restorient Studio, in Leiden in The Netherlands.

Slide1

Repairs for CBL Heb 751 toned with Yasha (left); harvested yasha cones (right).

In Japanese mounting studios yasha is used to dye the lining papers of both hanging and hand scrolls. The light brown colour obtained from yasha helps to soften the bright white tone of the lining paper and silk so that it is more sympathetic to the delicate tones of historic objects.

Through centuries of practical application, the traditional use of yasha has proven stability and durability which makes it suitable for conservation. Papers dyed with yasha remain pH neutral or slightly alkaline and retain their brightness and colour on ageing.Most plant dyes are light sensitive but yasha is lightfast.2 It continues to be used today for these qualities.
Like many features of the traditional Japanese conservation studio, yasha is now readily available to Western conservators. With a growing interest in adapting conservation techniques imported from East Asia and Japan, the use of alder cones has become a known technique for dyeing paper when working on Japanese or Chinese Art objects. However, its use has rarely been developed outside of this small circle.

JP presenting poster

Julia introducing her poster to attendees.

At the conference, the poster session took place on Thursday for over an hour after lunch, when attendees had the opportunity to ask questions about the research presented. I was delighted with the interest the research sparked and feedback I got from different conservators. Some had used the dye previously but were excited to hear about different application techniques, others were keen to be introduced to it and the ways to adapt its use to best suit our practice.

The conference finished with Friday visits organised at various institutions throughout the city, looking at the wonderful conservation work going on in Oslo!

Overall the two day conference was immensely varied and interesting to conservators of all generations who hopefully have learned from each other. The beautiful tributes to the important role of mentoring, teaching and sharing that Christopher Clarkson and Fred Bearman have played in the short history of conservation felt very appropriate with the overall topic of the conference. They will be sadly missed as pioneers and mentors to many.

Aurlandsfjorden

Aurlandsfjorden.

After the conference I took the opportunity to travel to Bergen. Norway is a stunning country and I was delighted to see some of the beautiful scenery, including these most amazing fjords along the way!

 

 

Julia Poirier,  Book and Paper Conservator

 

1 – Yeh, Brigitte. Munn, Jesse (2003) ‘An Evaluation of Xuan Paper Permanence and Discussion of Historical Chinese Paper Materials’ from ‘Scientific Research on the Pictorial Arts of Asia’. Edited by Paul Jett et al. Proceedings of the Second Forbes Symposium at the Freer Gallery, Washington DC, USA.

2 – Grantham, Sandra; Webber, Pauline, (2002) ‘Mellow yellow: toning papers with traditional Far Eastern colourants’, The Paper Conservator, Vol.26, pp. 49-57.

Delving into Russia – Conservation for Digitisation

The Library is currently working with scholars from the Saint-Petersburg State University in Russia, on the production of a facsimile of our seventeenth century manuscript of The Life of Alexander Nevskij (CBL W 151).

The manuscript contains the Russian version of the mythical exploits of Alexander the Great written in Russian Church Slavonic. It is illuminated with 73 drawings in pen outline and colours. Alexander appears clean-shaven and is often seen riding a unicorn. On the pages, he battles fearsome creatures like the medusa, centaurs, hybrid dog-headed men and other fantastic beasts in far off lands. Another part of the manuscript, containing a copy of the Tale of the Rout of Mamai, is housed at the British Library in London (Yates Thompson ms 51).

w-151_f-39v-40r_after_conservation_edited

CBL W 151, f.39v-40r after conservation

The text and miniatures will be published as a volume in the series, “Written artifacts of Russian History and Culture, stored in foreign libraries and archives.”

To facilitate this work the complete manuscript has recently been digitised, but before that could happen, the manuscript required conservation.

slide1

The manuscript’s 20th century binding; f.12-13 before conservation showing the restricted opening characteristics.

The manuscript is bound in a modern brown calf binding, most likely added at the beginning of the 20th century. The binding was very tight and prevented the book from being opened fully, causing the folios to curve steeply, and leaving areas of each page obscured at the spine-edge.

In order to increase the opening of the manuscript, whilst still retaining its most recent binding, the book was gently eased open. This simple but careful treatment required the book to be opened slowly page-by-page from front to back. This was done three times to ease the binding sufficiently to facilitate digitisation of the inner most spine-edge margin.

2017_composite_images

Dorothea gently working through the manuscript to ease it open.

In addition some edge repair of the folios was necessary to make the digitisation process easier and safer. The paper textblock is very soft and many pages had tears along the edges. The manuscript had been extensively repaired in the past, with Western and Japanese paper. In some places these older repairs had partly detached, especially where close to the spine-edge.

slide3

f.117-118 before (left) and after conservation (right)

A decision was made to leave these old repairs in place and they were reattached where they were at risk of being lost entirely, especially along the spine fold. Edge repair was then carried out with acrylic-toned Japanese Kozo paper and wheat starch paste.

With the binding eased, and the textblock stabilised, the manuscript could be digitised. The book was put onto a cradle with an angle of approximately 110° and the camera lens was positioned parallel to the pages of the book.

slide4

Positioning the manuscript in the digitisation cradle. The folios are carefully leveled to align with the camera.

To further reduce handling, the book was digitised in two stages; firstly the recto pages were photographed, and then the verso. The pages of the book were held in place with polythene tape as necessary. When first assessed it was thought to be unlikely that the manuscript could be successfully digitised without extensive and interventive treatment. It was rewarding to see that the simple easing of the binding permitted the digitisation of the inner most spine-edge margin. The edge repairs prevented any further tears to the paper and safe handling by the photographic services team enabled us to digitise and eventually share this remarkable text. Slide5.JPG

Dorothea MüllerHeritage Council Intern in Conservation

Wishing everyone a very happy St Patrick’s Day from all at the Chester Beatty Library.

Goya on the Go: Lending The Disasters of War

A selection of forty prints from the Chester Beatty collection have just gone on display in Belfast as part of an in-focus exhibition, Francisco Goya: The Disasters of War, at the Ulster Museum.

In September I started work on the preparation of this iconic series of prints. The Chester Beatty holds a complete Second Edition of The Disasters of War (Los Desastres de la Guerra) by Francisco de Goya (1746-1828). Formed of eighty aquatint prints, the series was first produced around 1820 and later printed in Madrid in 1892.

The prints were originally kept as a bound album. However, at some point in the past century the prints were removed from this format and mounted individually in window mounts for display. As the mounts were slightly too small for the prints, they had come in contact with the gummed linen tape used to assemble the mounts and in a number of cases the prints had adhered to the mount board, probably as a result of excess moisture applied during mounting. Apart from this, the paper support and media were in good condition, with only slight planar distortion in the printing plate area.

f1

Print before treatment: The mount is too small, and the object is in contact with the gummed hinge tape; During conservation: Lifting a print which was adhered to the gummed tape and the mount board.

Elisabeth Randell, a student in Paper Conservation at Camberwell College of Arts in London, started the conservation treatment of these objects during her summer placement with us. First, Elisabeth removed the prints from their unsuitable mounts, before gently surface cleaning them using chemical sponge and erasers as necessary. Old hinges were then removed using locally applied moisture. Edge tears were repaired as necessary using Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste.

I continued the preparation of the prints by adhering new Japanese paper hinges to the upper edge of the folios using wheat starch paste. New conservation-standard window mounts were then prepared, and the prints were carefully secured in the mounts using Japanese paper T-hinges. This allows the prints to be turned so that the verso can be viewed without incurring any damage.

figure-3

During conservation: Securing the conserved folio with new Japanese paper T-hinges

During my work on the prints, I was also assisted by Adam Macklin, a student in Book and Paper Conservation at the University of Amsterdam, who volunteered at the Chester Beatty Library for one week. Adam’s help was invaluable at each step of the mounting process, and ensured the work was completed on time.

am

After conservation: a conserved and mounted print, ready for exhibition. During conservation: Adam working on securing the prints in their new mount.

Finally, I assisted with the packing of the objects for travel. This included the preparation of six conservation-grade phase-boxes, the proper wrapping of the objects, and finally packing the crate for safe transport. The 40 prints to be exhibited were then transferred to the Ulster Museum, where they were framed by Conservator Gillian O’Neill and her team. Once framed, Julia Poirier and I travelled to Belfast to oversee the installation of the prints in the Ulster Museum’s print gallery.

crate

Loading the crate for travel; and packing the crate with the objects and protective foam.

figure-8

Installation at the Ulster Museum.

Thanks to this amazing project, I now have a much better understanding of the complete loan process in an institution. Working with different stakeholders was highly enriching, and taking part in the installation of the exhibition in at the Ulster Museum in Belfast was a great reward.

Cécilia Duminuco, Heritage Council Intern.

Francisco Goya: The Disasters of War will open on the 25th of November 2016 and will run until the 4th of June 2017.